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FM Restoration Stone Restoration, Repair, Brickwork Specialists
Repair and Restoration
Facade Cleaning
Brickwork repair and Tuckpointing
Precast Stone
New Stone
Rendering, Lime and Stucco
Granite and Marble
Paving and Flooring
Torc, Joss and Doff
Anti-slip surfacing
Concrete Repair
New Build
Case Studies
 
 
 

 

  Office 1 Unit B
Wrexham Road
Laindon
Basildon
Essex
SS15 6PX
 
     
  Tel: +44 (0) 1268 209806
Tel: +44 (0) 1268 209807

Fax: +44 (0) 870 4214768

Alternatively please send your enquiries to:

 
 
 
 

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We source new stone from local quarries, and can source specialist new stone from throughout Europe. Each project is individually assessed at tender stage with a lengthy process put in place to guarantee that the stone required for the individual project satisfies our clients requirements.

Portland stone
A limestone from the Tithonian stage of the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. The quarries consist of beds of white-grey limestone separated by chert beds. It has been used extensively as a building stone throughout the British Isles, notably in major public buildings in London such as St Paul's Cathedral and Buckingham Palace. It is also exported to many countries— Portland stone is used in the United Nations headquarters building in New York City, and by TH Stone landscaping for example.

York stone
A term for a variety of sandstone, specifically from quarries in Yorkshire that have been worked since medieval times, but now applied generally. Yorkstone is a tight grained, Carboniferous sedimentary rock. The stone consists of quartz, mica, feldspar, clay and iron oxides.
Known for its hard wearing and durable qualities Yorkstone has been used in a wide array of building, construction and landscaping applications around the world for many years. In Yorkshire, split stones called thackstone (Scots thack, English thatch) were employed as roofing. The traditional London paving stone has been York stone.

Bath stone
An Oolitic Limestone comprising granular fragments of calcium carbonate. Originally obtained from the Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines under Combe Down, Somerset, England, its warm, honey colouring gives the World Heritage City of Bath,England its distinctive appearance. An important feature of Bath Stone is that it is a freestone, that is one that can be sawn or 'squared up' in any direction, unlike other rocks such as slate, which forms distinct layers.
Bath Stone has been used extensively as a building material throughout southern England for churches, houses and public buildings such as railway stations.

Terracotta
Type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic, where the fired body is porous. Its uses include vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction, along with sculpture such as the Terracotta Army and Greek terracotta figurines. The term is also used to refer to items made out of this material and to its natural, brownish orange color, which varies considerably. In archaeology and art history, "terracotta" is often used of objects not made on a potter's wheel, such as figurines, where objects made on the wheel from the same material, possibly even by the same person, are called pottery

Lime stone
sedimentary rock composed largely of the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Many limestones are composed from skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral or foraminifera.
Limestone makes up about 10% of the total volume of all sedimentary rocks. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years. Most cave systems are through limestone bedrock.

Sand stone
A clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized minerals or rock grains.
Most sandstone is composed of quartz and/or feldspar because these are the most common minerals in the Earth's crust. Like sand, sandstone may be any colour, but the most common colours are tan, brown, yellow, red, gray, pink, white and black. Since sandstone beds often form highly visible cliffs and other topographic features, certain colours of sandstone have been strongly identified with certain regions.

Brown stone
A brown Triassic or Jurassic[citation needed] sandstone which was once a popular building material. The term is also used in the United States to refer to a terraced house (rowhouse) clad in this material.

   
   
   
       
   

FM Restoration Stone and Brickwork Specialists